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Today in History

1775
Prithvi Jayanti in Nepal
1878
Milk first delivered in bottles
1885
Original author of the proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution, activist and suffragette, Alice Stokes Paul born in Mount Laurel Township, New Jersey
1906
Author and chemist who discovered the psychoactive properties of LSD, Albert Hoffman born in Baden, Switzerland
1935
Amelia Earhart flies solo from Hawaii to California
1942
Japan declares war on the Netherlands
1946
Nurse, songwriter and Grammy award winning singer, Naomi Judd born in Ashland, Kentucky
1963
Whisky-A-Go-Go opens in Los Angeles
1964
US Surgeon General condemns cigarettes
1971
Grammy Award winning singer, Mary J. Blige born in Bronx, New York
1972
Social activist, stage and screen actress, Amanda Peet born in New York City
1980
Olympic Gold Medalist softball player, Lovieanne Jung born in Honolulu, Hawaii
49
BC
Julius Caesar leads his army across the Rubicon, plunging Rome into civil war.
314
Death of St. Militiades, Pope
347
Theodosius I, the Great, Spain, Roman emperor born
529
Death of St. Theodosius
705
Death of Pope John VI
1153
Death of David I, King of Scotland
1254
An Armenian monk attempts to baptize the KaKhan of the Mongols
1503
Francesco Parmigianino, Italian artist born
1569
First lottery is held in England, at St. Paul's Cathedral
1757
The first secretary of the US Treasury -- Alexander Hamilton -- He was born in the West Indies. born
1770
The first shipment of rhubarb was sent to the United States from London. Benjamin Franklin sent the plant to his buddy, John Bartram in Philadelphia.
1785
The Continental Congress convened in New York City.
1805
The Michigan Territory was created.
1807
Ezra Cornell, founder of Western Union Telegraph company and Cornell University born
1813
The first pineapples are planted in Hawaii.
1815
Sir John A. Macdonald, the first prime minister of Canada, He was born in Glasgow, Scotland. born
1839
Puerto Rican patriot Eugenio De Hostos born
1842
Psychologist and philosopher William James born
1843
Francis Scott Key, poet of "The Star-Spangled Banner," dies in Baltimore.
1861
Alabama secedes from the Union.
1862
Lincoln accepts Simon Cameron's resignation as Secretary of War.
1863
Bizet's music was first performed in public. He described it as "badly played, badly heard."
1878
Milk was delivered in glass bottles for the first time by one Alexander Campbell, in New York.
1885
Women's rights activist Alice Paul (founder of National Women's Party in 1913) born
1890
Actor Monte Blue (Rootin' Tootin' Rhythm, Thunder Pass, Song of the Gringo, Wagon Wheels, So This is Paris, Orphans of the Storm) born
1902
"Popular Mechanics" magazine was published for the first time.
1903
South African novelist Alan Paton ("Cry the Beloved Country") born
1904
British troops massacre 1,000 dervishes in Somaliland.
1910
Baseball pitcher Schoolboy (Lynwood Thomas) Rowe born
1912
Roger Lewis, aviation executive born
1913
The first sedan-type car was unveiled at the National Automobile Show in New York City. The car was manufactured by the Hudson Motor Company.
1923
Auto racer Carroll Shelby born
1924
Singer Don Cherry (Band of Gold) born
1925
Aaron Copland's jazzy, dissonant Organ Symphony was performed in New York. The Organ Symphony's outer movements are a little hard on the ears even today. But the middle movement, a scherzo, is jumpy, fun music, well worth hearing.
1926
Producer Grant Tinker born
1928
Producer David L. Wolper born
1929
Actor Rod Taylor (The Birds, Masquerade, The Time Machine) some sources list 1930 born
1929
In the Soviet Union, the Bolsheviks reduce the work day to seven hours.
1929
Turkey adopts the European metric system.
1934
The prime minister of Canada, Jean Chretien born
1934
The German police raid the homes of dissident clergy in Berlin.
1935
Aviator Amelia Earhart began a trip from Honolulu to Oakland, California, that made her the first woman to fly solo across the Pacific Ocean.
1938
The first woman bank president, Frances Moulton, assumed her duties in Limerick, Maine.
1940
Charles Edison, son of the inventor, is appointed as Secretary of the Navy.
1942
Rock musician Clarence Clemons (Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band) born
1942
Japan declared war against the Netherlands, the same day that Japanese forces invaded the Dutch East Indies.
1943
Radio host Jim Hightower born
1943
The United States and Britain signed treaties relinquishing extraterritorial rights in China.
1945
Actress Christine Kaufmann (Bagdad Cafe, Murders in the Rue Morgue, Taras Bulba, The Last Days of Pompeii) born
1946
Country singer Naomi (Diane) Judd born
1948
Truman proposes free, two-year community colleges for all who want an education.
1949
Singer Dennis (Frederick) Greene (Group Roll is Here to Stay!, The Golden Age of Rock `n' Roll) born
1952
Golfer Ben Crenshaw born
1958
Lloyd Bridges starred as Mike Nelson, an ex-Navy frogman who became an underwater trouble shooter in "Seahunt" on CBS-TV. The show remained on the network for four years.
1958
Musician Guitar Vicki Peterson (Group; The Bangles like an Egyptian, Manic Monday) born
1962
Actress Kim Coles ("Living Single") born
1964
US Surgeon General Luther Terry issued the first government report saying smoking may be hazardous to one's health.
1964
Some Picasso works that have never been seen before go on exhibit in Toronto.
1965
The Interagency Council on Smoking Health says 125,000 Americans will die from cigarettes in 1965 alone.
1969
Rhythm-and-blues singer Maxee Maxwell (Brownstone) born
1971
Singer Mary J. Blige born
1971
Musician Tom Rowlands (The Chemical Brothers) born
1972
Actress Amanda Peet born
1973
Owners of American League baseball teams voted to adopt the designated-hitter rule on a trial basis.
1977
France set off an international uproar by releasing Abu Daoud, a Palestinian suspected of involvement in the massacre of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics.
1978
Two Soviet cosmonauts aboard the "Soyuz 27" capsule linked up with the "Salyut Six" orbiting space station, where the "Soyuz 26" capsule was already docked.
1979
Surgeon general's report leaves no doubt that smoking causes lung cancer.
1980
Honda to build Japan's first U.S. passenger-car assembly plant in Ohio.
1987
The Denver Broncos edged the Cleveland Browns 23-to-20 in overtime and the New York Giants trounced the Washington Redskins 17-0, sending the two winning teams to the Super Bowl.
1988
Vice President George Bush met with representatives of independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh to answer questions about the Iran-Contra affair.
1988
At the 24th Annual People's Choice Awards "ER" was chosen favorite TV drama series for the fourth straight year and Seinfeld was chosen the favorite comedy for the third year running.
1988
The Soviet Union announced it would participate in the 1988 Seoul Summer Olympics.
1988
World War Two flying ace Gregory "Pappy" Boyington died in Fresno, California, at age 75.
1989
President Reagan bade the nation farewell in an address from the Oval Office.
1990
Martial law, imposed during the June 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy movement, was lifted in Beijing.
1990
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev visited Lithuania, where he sought to assure supporters of independence that they would have a say in their republic's future.
1991
The United States and Iraq intensified their rhetoric, with Secretary of State James A. Baker the Third telling Air Force pilots in Saudi Arabia, "We pass the brink at midnight January 15," and Iraqi President Saddam Hussein boasting of his army's readiness.
1992
The president of Algeria (Chadli Bendjedid) resigned, two weeks after Muslim fundamentalists had defeated his ruling party in legislative elections.
1993
Andrew Davis and the BBC Philharmonic recorded a whole bunch of brief Delius pieces for Teldec. It included a piece called "Paris" and another called "Walk to the Paradise Garden."
1993
Former independent presidential candidate Ross Perot publicly returned to politics, recruiting Americans for a watchdog group which, he told CNN, would counter special interests that were preventing government reform and deficit reduction.
1994
NATO leaders concluded a two-day summit in Belgium by warning Bosnian Serbs of their willingness to order bombing raids in former Yugoslavia to relieve embattled Muslim enclaves. President Clinton, who attended the summit, then traveled to the Czech Republic for a short visit.
1995
Fifty-two people were killed when a Colombian airliner crashed as it was preparing to land near the Caribbean resort of Cartagena; a nine-year-old girl survived.
1995
President Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama held a low-key summit in Washington, playing down differences over trade
1995
52 people were killed when a Colombian airliner crashed as it was preparing to land near the Caribbean resort of Cartagena; a nine-year-old girl survived.
1996
Addressing pointed questions about the first lady, President Clinton offered a rousing defense of his wife, Hillary, during a news conference.
1996
Ryutaro Hashimoto was chosen the new prime minister of Japan.
1996
Funeral services were held for former French president Francois Mitterrand.
1996
The space shuttle "Endeavour" blasted off on a nine-day mission.
1997
President Clinton summoned top administration officials to a daylong planning session for his second term.
1997
An earthquake of magnitude seven-point-three shook Mexico City and the southern part of Mexico, but no deaths were reported.
1998
Utility workers and the National Guard struggled to clear roads and restore electric power to thousands of people in New England and New York state as cold weather descended on the battered region. Storms blamed on El Nino hammered the area with three days of freezing rain.
1998
Two Spanish lovers were literally caught with their pants down at church Sunday when members of a stunned congregation surprised them in the throes of passion. "They weren't actually having sex but the girl's trousers were down around her ankles and they were very touchy-feely," a police spokesman in the northern Spanish city of Valladolid said. The man was detained when he resisted police efforts to stop what the spokesman called "obscene acts."
1998
The Denver Broncos beat the Pittsburgh Steelers, 24-to-21, to win the American Football Conference Championship; the Green Bay Packers defeated the San Francisco 49ers, 23-to-10, to claim the National Football Conference Championship.
1998
Hundreds of prisoners rioted at a jail in southwest Colombia and by nightfall they were still holding 567 visitors hostage, most of them women, after freeing 18 hostages earlier in the day. The prisoners were calling for improvements in squalid jail conditions.
1999
President Clinton and House Republicans clashed in impeachment trial papers, with the White House claiming the perjury and obstruction allegations fell short of high crimes and misdemeanors and GOP lawmakers rebutting: "If this is not enough, what is?"
2000
Whittling away more of the federal government's power over states, the US Supreme Court ruled, 5-to-4, that state employees cannot go into federal court to sue over age bias.
2000
Carlton Fisk and Tony Perez were elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame.
2005
Jobs unveils new products after cloud of secrecy and lawsuits
2005
Third case of BSE reported in Canada
2005
Bush nominates Chertoff for new Secretary of Homeland Security
2005
Mamdouh Habib to be released from Guantanamo Bay without charge
2006
Whole Foods moves to renewable energy
2006
Former NSA employee alleges illegal spying
2006
Chinese block of Wikimedia enters tenth week
2006
Smoke reported on London Underground
2006
Ukraine hurt by Russian gas deal
2006
Comet Wild samples near home
2006
Seven-year old Tennessee boy chased by police
2006
Opera Singer Birgit Nilsson, 87 was buried today
2006
Apple unveils new Intel-based Mac
2006
UN warns neighbours of Turkey about bird flu
2006
Stars pose for ITV ice-skating show (UK)
2007
Canadian sextuplets could get blood transfusion, religion forbids it
2007
Large blizzard sweeps through British Columbia, Northern Alberta and Saskatchewan
2007
Bank of England raises interest rates
2007
CBS blog criticizes stations' coverage of Tigger incident
2007
US House votes Federal minimum wage increase
2007
Bush unveils America's new Iraq plan
2007
Ontario, Canada byelections announced
2008
Hezbollah network Al-Manar available to wider international audience
2008
Hamas leader criticizes Bush's Middle East visit
2008
Snow falls in Baghdad for first time in 100 years
2008
Mexican senator Andrés Henestrosa dies at 101
2008
KDE 4 desktop environment released
2008
FC Bayern Munich sign Jürgen Klinsmann as new coach
2008
Sir Edmund Hillary dead at 88
2008
Televised press conference Sunday to announce Golden Globes winners
2008
Opposition calls for mass rallies across Kenya
2009
Waves of arrests in Turkey on suspicion of involvement in 'Ergenekon' organization
2009
Too Grimm? Mother Goose cartoonist sued by Colombian coffee growers
2009
US salmonella outbreak linked to peanut butter, brand recalls product
2009
UN Security Council passes Gaza ceasefire resolution
2009
Cristiano Ronaldo crashes Ferrari at Manchester Airport
2010
French Guiana and Martinique reject referendum for increased autonomy
2010
Illinois high school boys basketball: Benet beats Carmel after losing previous close games
2010
NFL Playoffs: Cardinals thrill Packers in overtime
2010
United Airlines flight makes emergency landing at Newark Airport
2010
Health expert: Swine flu outbreak exaggerated by pharmaceutical companies for profits
2010
US Senate Majority leader Harry Reid criticized over "Negro" comments
2010
Angolan police arrest two after attack on Togo football team
2011
Moon water possibly originated from comets, data shows
2011
'Brakes failed': fourteen killed in Guatemala bus crash
2012
US Coast Guard rescues Iranian ship
2013
All branches of UK photography retailer Jessops close today

In the early days of Unix, a date-tagged list of historical events was used by system administrators to add some interest to the system's Message of the Day. Whenever users logged in they would be presented with the latest system notices, perhaps some mildly amusing quotes and one or two lines of historical events, based on the current date.

Today in History (UNIX calendar) uses some of the entries from the original library but is updated with current events as well. Instead of plain text, each entry is now formatted in HTML and each day may include one or more icons of historical figures or celebrities.

Other things unique to the UNIX calendar are references to dates found in fictional literature such as Lord of the Rings, perhaps undue emphasis on people and events that were part of popular culture in the 70's and technical minutiae about computers and operating systems that might not be found in other places.

In association with Amazon, this symbol is a link to related products at amazon.com. Any proceeds resulting from the sales of these products are used to defray the cost of maintaining the Today in History site and editorial efforts.

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