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Today in History

LOTR...
Passing of King Elessar
1692
Sarah Goode, Sarah Osborne, and Tituba arrested for witchcraft in Massachusetts
1896
Henri Becquerel discovers radioactivity
1910
Soldier, itinerant worker and Academy Award winning actor, David Niven born in London, England
1919
Samil Independence Day, South Korea
1935
Director, actor and member of the Stunt Man Hall of Fame, Robert Conrad born in Chicago, Illinois
1946
Actress and Bond girl, Lana Wood born Svetlana Gurdin in Santa Monica, California
1954
Academy Award winning actor, film director, and producer Ron Howard born in Duncan, Oklahoma
1964
First NPL (PL/I) report published
1244
Fall of Montsegur (Albigensian Crusade)
1360
Chaucer ransomed from his French captors
1382
Maillotin Rising, Paris (Peasant Revolt)
1383
Charles IV, King of France, subdues Paris
1383
Death of Amadeo, the "Green Count" of Savoy
1389
St. Antonius born
1410
Total Solar Eclipse
1410
Burning of John Badby, tailor, for heresy
1469
William Caxton begins to translate "Receuil of the Histories of Troy" from the French, to become the first book printed in English
1524
Giovanni de Verrazzano sights land at Cape Fear, North Carolina
1527
Patrick Hamilton burnt for heresy, in Scotland
1546
George Wishart burnt for heresy
1555
Nostradamus publishes his prophecies, entitled "Centuries"
1562
Massacre of Vassy
1565
Rio de Janiero, Brazil, founded
1638
Scots National Covenant signed
1638
First Swedish settlers arrive in North America
1642
York, Maine becomes the first American city to incorporate.
1643
Girolamo Frescobaldi, Italian organist, composer, dies
1661
Richard Zouche, a founder of international law, dies
1692
Sarah Goode, Sarah Osborne and Tituba are arrested for the supposed practice of withcraft in Salem, Mass.
1780
Pennsylvania became the first state to abolish slavery.
1781
The Articles of Confederation were adopted by the Continental Congress. They remained the supreme law of the nation until March 4, 1789.
1790
Congress authorized the first U.S. Census.
1803
Ohio becomes the 17th state.
1810
Frederic Chopin born, in Warsaw. Chopin's love life was romantic but not especially successful. He composed some of his best music in honor of a young lady in Warsaw whom he was too shy to approach. Tuberculosis killed him at the age of 39. born
1826
J.H. Hackett of New York debuted "Love a Village" at the Park Theater New York City. One month later, he played London, England, becoming the first American actor to appear abroad.
1837
Author William Dean Howells (Life of Lincoln, A Modern Instance, The Rise of Silas Lapham) born
1845
President Tyler signed a congressional resolution to annex the Republic of Texas.
1848
Augustus Saint-Gaudens, US sculptor, designed 1907 $20 gold piece. born
1860
Suzanna Salter, first female mayor born
1864
Rebecca Lee became the first black woman to receive a medical degree, from the New England Female Medical College Boston.
1864
Patent issued for taking & projecting motion pictures to Louis Ducos du Hauron (he never did build such a machine, though)
1867
Nebraska became the 37th state of the Union.
1872
Congress authorized creation of Yellowstone National Park.
1873
E. Remington and Sons of Lion, New York, began the manufacturing of the first practical typewriter.
1875
Congress passes the Civil Rights Act, which is invalidated by the Supreme Court in 1883.
1886
The Battle of Adowa began Ethiopia between the forces of Emperor Menelik II and Italian troops sent to enforce Italy's claim to colonial rule. The result was a crushing defeat for Italy, which later agreed to recognize Ethiopian independence.
1890
Sherlock Holmes made his U.S. book debut as J.P. Lippincott published the "A Study Scarlet" by Arthur Conan Doyle.
1904
Bandleader Glenn Miller born Clarinda, Iowa. Miller disappeared Dec. 15, 1944 over the English Channel on a flight to Paris where he was scheduled to give a show. (Moonlight Serenade, In the Mood, Little Brown Jug, Chattanooga Choo-Choo, String of Pearls, Tuxedo Junction) born
1907
There are only 15,000 Jews left in Odessa, Russia. The attacks on the Jews continue as more and more evacuate.
1910
Actor David Niven born in Kirriemuir, Angus, Scotland. Niven won an Oscar 1958 for "Separate Table." His other films include "Around the World Eighty Days," "Casino Royale" and "The Pink Panther." born
1911
Jose Ordonez is elected the president of Uruguay.
1912
Captain Albert Berry of the Jefferson Barracks St. Louis, Missouri, made the first parachute jump from a moving airplane. This first in-flight parachute jump was from a Benoist plane over Kinlock Field in St. Louis. He jumped from an altitude of 1,500 feet at a speed of 50 mph.
1915
The Allies announce their aim to cut off all German supplies, and assure the safety of the neutrals.
1917
Poet Robert Lowell (Lord Weary's Castle, The Dolphin, National Book Award for Poetry ) born
1917
Singer (Frances) Dinah Shore (Dear Hearts and Gentle People, Yes My Darling Daughter, Anniversary Song, Buttons and Bows, Blues in the Night) born
1917
Country singer Cliffie Stone born
1919
The Korean coalition proclaims their independence from Japan.
1921
The Allies reject a $7.5 billion reparations offer in London. German delagations decides to quit all talks.
1922
Comedian Michael Flanders born
1922
Mad Magazine founder William Maxwell Gaines born in New York City. "Mad," launched 1952, as an irreverent monthly with humorous illustrations and writing that satirized mass media and politicians. born
1922
Israeli Prime Minister and Nobel Peace Prize winner Yitzhak Rabin born
1924
Former astronaut Donald "Deke" Slayton born
1926
Former NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle born
1926
Actor Robert Clary born
1927
Singer Harry Belafonte (The Banana Boat Song, Jamaica Farewell, Mary's Boy Child) born
1927
Former US Solicitor General Robert H. Bork born
1928
Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra recorded "Ol' Man River" for Victor Records.
1932
The infant son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh was kidnapped from the family's home near Hopewell, New Jersey. (Remains identified as those of the baby were found the following May.)
1935
Author Judith Rossner born
1935
Actor Robert (Falk) Conrad (The Wild Wild West, High Mountain Rangers with sons: Christian & Shane, Crossfire, Lady in Red, Samurai Cowboy) born
1937
U.S. Steel raised workers' wages. Steelworkers received a raise to $5 per day, about 40 per hour.
1940
"Native Son" by Richard Wright was first published.
1940
U.S. envoy, Sumner Welles meets with Hitler in Berlin.
1941
FM Radio began when station W47NV Nashville, Tennessee, started operations. W47NV was the first commercial FM radio station to receive a license, some 20 years after its AM radio counterpart, KDKA Pittsburgh.
1941
Bulgaria joins the Axis as the Nazis occupy Sofia.
1942
Japanese troops land on Java in the Pacific.
1943
The British RAF conducts strategic bombing raids on all European railway lines.
1944
Rock star Roger Daltry (Group born
1944
Rock singer Mike D'Abo (Manfred Mann) born
1945
Actor Dirk Benedict born
1945
President Franklyn D. Roosevelt, having just returned from the Yalta Conference, proclaimed the meeting a success an address to a joint session of Congress.
1947
Actor Alan Thicke born
1949
The "Brown Bomber," Joe Louis announced that he would retire from boxing as world heavyweight boxing champion. Louis held the title longer than any other, 11 years, eight months and seven days.
1954
Country singer Janis Gill (Sweethearts of the Rodeo) born
1954
Actor/Director Ron Howard born
1954
Actress Catherine Bach born
1954
Armed Puerto Rican nationalists, firing wildly from the gallery of the U.S. House of Representatives, wounded five congressmen.
1956
Actor ("Wings") Tim Daly born
1957
Singer-musician Jon Carroll born
1958
Doctors declare that President Eisenhower has fully recovered from his stroke.
1960
1,000 Black students pray and sing the national anthem on the steps of the old Confederate Capitol in Montgomery, Alabama.
1961
Football player Mike Rozier born
1961
President Kennedy established the Peace Corps.
1962
Rock musician Bill Leen (formerly of The Gin Blossoms) born
1966
Actor John David Cullum born
1966
Moscow reports that a space probe has crashed on Venus.
1967
U.S. Rep. Adam Clayton Powell of New York, accused of misconduct, was denied his seat the 90th Congress. (The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 1969 that Powell had to be seated.)
1968
Country music stars, Johnny Cash and June Carter, got married.
1968
Elton John's first record, "I've Been Loving You" was released by Philips Records in England.
1969
Mickey Mantle announces his retirement from baseball.
1974
Actor Mark-Paul Gosselaar born
1974
A grand jury indicts seven of President Nixon's aides for the conspiracy on Watergate.
1981
Irish Republican Army member Bobby Sands began a hunger strike at the Maze Prison Northern Ireland; he died 65 days later.
1983
A freak tornado tore through downtown Los Angeles, injuring 33 people; another twister touched down Pasadena.
1983
President and Mrs. Reagan treated Britain's Queen Elizabeth II and Prine Philip to a Mexican lunch at the president's California ranch.
1985
The Pentagon accepts the theory that an atomic war would block the sun, causing a "nuclear winter"
1985
CBS stock rose four points on the New York Stock Exchange amid reports Ted Turner was considering a bid to buy control of the network. (Turner later dropped his bid.)
1986
A directive signed by President Reagan went into effect, making possible the execution of military people convicted of espionage during peacetime.
1987
Five people were killed at the Pyrenees ski resort of Luz-Ardiden when a damaged chairlift pitched dozens of skiers onto rocks and snow as far as 150 feet below.
1987
S&H Green Stamps became S&H Green Seals, 90 years after the lick-and-stick stamps were introduced as a way for businesses to bonus their customers -- who then used the stamps to buy merchandise from catalog stores.
1988
President Reagan arrived Brussels, Belgium for the first NATO summit six years.
1988
Iraq said it had 16 missiles into Tehran the first long-range rocket attack on the Iranian capital since the Iran-Iraq war began.
1989
The Senate overwhelmingly approved Dr. Louis W. Sullivan to be secretary of health and human services and Admiral James D. Watkins to be secretary of energy.
1990
The controversial Seabrook, New Hampshire, nuclear power plant won federal permission to go on-line after two decades of protests and legal struggles.
1991
President Bush said "we've kicked the Vietnam syndrome once and for all" following the allied victory the Gulf War. The U.S. Embassy Kuwait officially reopened.
1991
Edward H. Land, inventor of polarizing filters and Polaroid photography, died Cambridge, Massachusetts, at age 81.
1992
23 people were killed in the collapse of a building housing a cafe in East Jerusalem.
1993
Authorities near Waco, Texas, continued negotiating with Branch Davidians holed up in their bullet-scarred compound, a day after a furious gun battle between the Davidians and federal agents that left ten people dead.
1993
The Cleveland Quartet played Schubert's "Death and the Maiden" Quartet at Carnegie Hall. That was the first half of the program; the second half was one of the late Beethoven quartets, the Opus 131 in C-sharp minor.
1994
A Lebanese immigrant opened fire on a van of Hasidic students on New York's Brooklyn Bridge, killing one of them.
1994
Falling four votes shy of a two-thirds majority, the Senate rejected a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution.
1994
At the 36th annual Grammy Awards, Whitney Houston won best female pop vocalist and record of the year for "I Will Always Love You;" "The Bodyguard" won album of the year.
1995
Somalia militiamen loyal to warlord Mohammed Farrah Aidid seized control of Mogadishu airport after peacekeepers withdrew.
1995
At the 37th annual Grammy Awards Los Angeles, Sheryl Crow won record of the year for "All I Wanna Do" while Tony Bennett's "MTV Unplugged" was named best album.
1996
President Clinton slapped economic sanctions on Colombia, concluding that Colombian authorities had not fully cooperated with the U.S. war on drugs
1996
The Food and Drug Administration approved a powerful new AIDS drug, saying ritonavir could prolong slightly the lives of severely ill patients.
1997
Rescue teams fought snow, high winds and wild dogs as they tried to bring help to an earthquake-devastated region in northwest Iran, where the death toll was estimated at three-thousand.
1997
Severe storms hit Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee and Mississippi, and spawned tornadoes in Arkansas blamed for two dozen deaths.
1998
Between 10 and 30 people died in fighting between Serbian police and ethnic Albanians in Serbia's mainly Albanian southern province of Kosovo. It appeared to be the worst outbreak of bloodshed in two years of deteriorating nationalist tensions in Kosovo where pro-independence ethnic Albanians outnumber Serbs by nine to one in the 2 million population.
1998
Key U.S. senators called on President Clinton to reverse course and make ousting President Saddam Hussein a stated U.S. goal in Iraq. "I would say it's our goal to remove him from power because ... as long as he's there, we're faced with this enormous challenge," Sen. John McCain said on NBC's "Meet the Press."
1999
The General Accounting Office released an audit of the Internal Revenue Service which found chronic problems in the agency's record-keeping.
1999
An attack by Rwandan Hutu rebels in a Ugandan national park left eight foreign tourists, including two Americans, and a park guard dead.
2000
Classes were canceled at Buell Elementary School in Mount Morris Township, Michigan, a day after 6-year-old Kayla Rolland was fatally shot by a fellow first-grader.
2000
Candidates in both major parties turned their focus to Super Tuesday, a day after Texas Governor George W. Bush won primaries in Virginia, North Dakota and Washington state.
2000
A gunman in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, fatally shot three men and wounded two others.
2005
New flood warning system introduced in Romania
2005
British investors are increasingly interested in Romania
2005
Controversial melatonin supplements confirmed as sleep aid
2005
Green tea component protects heart cells
2005
U.S. Supreme Court: Death penalty for juveniles is unconstitutional
2005
Elan; Biogen withdraw multiple sclerosis drug after death
2005
Britain unveils flu pandemic preparedness plan, buys 14m courses of treatment drug
2005
Bomb blast kills Iraqi police, army recruits
2005
New version of Firefox web browser released
2005
Jermaine Pennant jailed for drink-driving
2006
Sizzler salad bars shut after rat poison found in food
2006
Random driver drug testing to become permanent in Victoria
2006
Possible first case of mad cow disease in Sweden
2006
Sydney woman charged in Perth heroin seizure
2006
Thaksin denies rumours of resignation
2006
Saddam Hussein admits to requesting trials
2006
English Wikipedia reaches one million articles
2006
Duke upset by FSU
2006
Intelligence agencies warned about growing local insurgency in late 2003
2006
Brisbane woman charged with Sizzler poisoning
2007
Professional athletes in US linked to online steroid ring
2007
Taliban leader: Osama bin Laden is "still alive" and "Taliban ready to strike Americans"
2007
Toxic chemical spills in the Ohio River
2007
NHL: Shorthand a success in Penguins win over Rangers
2007
Blackburn defeat Arsenal in FA Cup
2007
Columbine High School evacuated following bomb scare
2007
Large tornadoes strike southern United States
2007
Swatch to organize new snow sports competition
2007
Yahoo!7 and Xtra New Zealand's website launched
2008
National Hockey League news: March 1, 2008
2008
Mystery surrounds ricin discovery in Las Vegas hotel
2008
Wikileaks.org restored as injunction is lifted
2008
Thousands of Filipinos call for President Arroyo's resignation; former presidents join protest
2008
Guatemalan bus crash kills 57, wounds 40
2008
Iraqi archbishop from Mosul kidnapped, three aides killed
2008
Northrop Grumman and Airbus parent EADS defeat Boeing for $40 billion US airtanker contract
2008
Gordon Brown makes speech as part of Labour Party conference
2008
FARC second-in-command killed by Colombian military
2008
Negotiations between Athens and Skopje lead to deadlock
2008
Iquique, Chile struck by moderate earthquake
2008
Netscape Navigator support ceases today
2008
Canadian film academy explains lack of Genie nomination for Juno
2008
Wild Canadian Goose tests positive for H5N1 in England
2008
Jemaah Islamiyah leader Mas Selamat escapes from Singapore prison
2009
Record number of failed banks reported in US for February
2009
Afghan protestors shot after mosque raid sparks anger
2009
Thousands take part in protests across US against government's financial policy
2009
Australian football: Melbourne Victory win A-League grand final
2009
Obama sets deadline to withdraw troops from Iraq
2010
Medvedev asks for resignations from Russian Olympic officials after performance in Vancouver
2010
Roadside bomb in southern Afghanistan kills at least eleven
2010
Major storms batter Europe
2013
New Zealand's Adam Hall and Corey Peters finish run at IPC Alpine World Championships
2013
Nathalie Carpanedo finishes wild card run at IPC Alpine World Championships
2013
Australia's Mitchell Gourley finishes up at IPC Alpine World Championships

In the early days of Unix, a date-tagged list of historical events was used by system administrators to add some interest to the system's Message of the Day. Whenever users logged in they would be presented with the latest system notices, perhaps some mildly amusing quotes and one or two lines of historical events, based on the current date.

Today in History (UNIX calendar) uses some of the entries from the original library but is updated with current events as well. Instead of plain text, each entry is now formatted in HTML and each day may include one or more icons of historical figures or celebrities.

Other things unique to the UNIX calendar are references to dates found in fictional literature such as Lord of the Rings, perhaps undue emphasis on people and events that were part of popular culture in the 70's and technical minutiae about computers and operating systems that might not be found in other places.

In association with Amazon, this symbol is a link to related products at amazon.com. Any proceeds resulting from the sales of these products are used to defray the cost of maintaining the Today in History site and editorial efforts.

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